Carly S. Woods

Assistant Professor
Faculty

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

2118 Skinner Building
Professional Interests: 

Carly S. Woods researches and teaches about argumentation, social change, and the rhetoric of diverse voices. Her work focuses on how deliberation and debate can be used to negotiate identity, power, and social difference. She draws from feminist, cultural, and rhetorical theory to explore histories of public address and argument, with an eye toward how they might inform contemporary discourse. Her publications appear in the Quarterly Journal of Speech, Argumentation and Advocacy, Women’s Studies in Communication, KB Journal, and elsewhere. Woods is the recipient of the Organization for Research on Women and Communication’s Research Development Grant, the American Society for the History of Rhetoric’s Outstanding Dissertation Award, the Helen F. Faust Women Writers Award, and several teaching honors. She is an affiliate faculty member in UMD’s Department of Women’s Studies.

Curriculum Vitae

Website: www.carlyswoods.com

Current Research Projects:

Dr. Woods’s book manuscript draws from rich archival sources to explore how women debaters created and sustained spaces for argumentation in the United States and United Kingdom from 1835 to 1945. Other article-length projects include studies of rhetoric’s feminine figures (with Michele Kennerly), and of race in popular representations of debating societies.

Representative Publications:

Pfister, D.S. & Woods, C.S. (2016). The unnaturalistic enthymeme: Figuration, interpretation and critique after digital mediation. Argumentation and Advocacy 52 (4), 236-253.

Woods, C.S., Ewalt, J.P. & Baker, S.J. (2013). A matter of regionalism: Remembering Brandon Teena and Willa Cather at the Nebraska History Museum. Quarterly Journal of Speech 99 (3), 341-363.

Woods, C.S. (2012). (Im)mobile metaphors: Toward an intersectional rhetorical history. In Karma Chávez and Cindy Griffin (Eds.), Standing in the intersection: Feminist voices, feminist practices in Communication Studies, 78-96. Albany: SUNY Press.