New Research from UM Scholars

Studies Appear in Health Communication; WSIC

New research authored by UM Department of Communication graduate students and faculty has just been published.

http://www.comm.umd.edu/sites/comm.umd.edu/files/HC%20Cover.jpghttp://www.comm.umd.edu/sites/comm.umd.edu/files/AdamRichards_0.jpgPh.D. student Adam Richards is the author of "Predicting Attitude Toward Methamphetamine Use: The Role of Antidrug Campaign Exposure and Conversations about Meth in Montana" that appears in the journal Health Communication. Richards's investigation utilized the integrative model of behavioral prediction to assess the Montana Meth Project (MMP) campaign by testing theoretical antecedents of attitude toward methamphetamine (meth) use. College students in Montana (N = 403) were surveyed about their exposure to MMP ads and communication about meth in conversation. Structural equation modeling showed that the data fit the specified model well. Significant parameters indicated that only beliefs about the negative relational outcomes of meth use, and not about personal well-being or physical appearance, were related to attitude. Attention, rather than encoded exposure, to MMP ads related to each belief about meth use. Conversation frequency related to engagement with MMP ads, and a conversational partner's conveyed attitude toward meth use related to personal and physical beliefs as well as attitudes. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

Citation: Adam S. Richards, "Predicting Attitude Toward Methamphetamine Use: The Role of Antidrug Campaign Exposure and Conversations about Meth in Montana," Health Communication (2013). doi:10.1080/10410236.2012.728469.

http://www.comm.umd.edu/sites/comm.umd.edu/files/WSIC.jpgLecturer Alyssa Samek and Ph.D. student Theresa Donofrio are the authors of "'Academic Drag' and the Performance of the Critical Personae: An Exchange on Sexuality, Politics, and Identity in the Academy," that appears in the latest issue of Women's Studies in Communication. Their article analyzes the process of queering the academy by focusing on the politics and praxis that constitute sexuality's role(s) in academic spaces. They advance their critique through a dialogue to centralize their identities as they interrogate the treatment of the queer project within the academy. Samek & Donofrio's analysis reveals a contradiction that hamstrings the advancement of queer rhetorical work in the very locus that should bring new life to the discipline: the graduate classroom.

Citation: Alyssa A. Samek & Theresa A. Donofrio, "'Academic Drag' and the Performance of the Critical Personae: An Exchange on Sexuality, Politics, and Identity in the Academy," Women's Studies in Communication 36 (2013): 28-55.

http://www.comm.umd.edu/sites/comm.umd.edu/files/Samek%203_1.jpghttp://www.comm.umd.edu/sites/comm.umd.edu/files/Donofrio4_1.jpg

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