Liu Authors Study of Cross-Cultural Negotiation in HCR

Assistant professor Meina Liu is the author of a new study in Human Communication Research. Her essay, entitled "The Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Effects of Anger on Negotiation Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Investigation," appears in the January 2009 issue of HCR and is available in the journal's online format.

Liu's study, based in part on her doctoral dissertation research at Purdue under the direction of Steve Wilson, assesses the effects of negotiators' anger on their own and their counterparts' use of negotiation strategies and whether such effects were moderated by national culture. Participants (N= 130) were 66 sojourning Chinese and 64 Americans who performed an intracultural negotiation simulation. Findings indicated that (a) anger caused negotiators to use more positional statements and propose fewer integrative offers, (b) anger caused the counterparts to use fewer positional statements but also exchange less information about priorities, (c) Chinese negotiators used more persuasive arguments as their counterparts' anger increased, whereas Americans did not, and (d) Chinese negotiators used more distributive and fewer integrative tactics than American negotiators. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed in this article.

HCRCitation: Meina Liu, "The Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Effects of Anger on Negotiation Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Investigation,"Human Communication Research 35 (2009): 148-169.

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